Friday, November 15, 2019
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Famous Emerald Engagement Rings – Choosing an Emerald Engagement Ring Stone

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The emerald is considered by many to be a restorative healing gemstone for ailments of the body and mind. Many historic healers believed that wearing or being near an emerald would increase wellness of the heart. Besides that, some thought the green color and soothing properties of the emerald would provide relief to the eyes and heal vision ailments.

Deep green shades and a soft, velvety look make emeralds special among gems. As symbols of wealth and nature, emeralds have been famous jewelry stones in spite of their low durability and rarity. Learn what to look for in an emerald engagement ring stone and how to find the suitable one for your spending budget. Suggestions for an Emerald Engagement Ring by segaljewellery.com/: Before we get into the details, keep in mind these guidelines for a gorgeous emerald engagement ring as well as emerald wedding ring.

See Before You Buy

The absolute most essential factor when you are purchasing an emerald is that you like it! When you are buying, make sure you can see the individual stone you are buying. Color, clarity, and cut all vary from one emerald to the next, and it is extremely hard to tell the quality of an emerald without seeing it. Keep in mind that one vendor’s “AAA” quality is another’s “AA.” In other words, there’s no industry standard to explain emerald quality.

Figuring out emerald quality from a photo can be challenging, too. Traces of chromium, which produce the green color in most emeralds, make emerald color notoriously hard to capture on camera. Therefore, it’s very difficult to buy emeralds online. That is why we suggest operating with a highly rated custom jeweler like custom made. Their experts can assist you pick the proper stone for your spending budget and make the perfect ring for you and your sweetheart.

Consider Lab-Made Gems or Alternatives

Do you prefer an emerald – or just a bright pop of green? There are a lot of reasons to choose for artificial or lab-made gems, but it’s a particularly tempting option for emeralds. Natural or mined emeralds have a lot of blemishes, making them vulnerable to breaking. For a ring you are wearing daily, it can get risky. Lab-made emeralds are less pricey and frequently have better quality than mined stones. That tends to make them not only gorgeous but also simpler to switch if something goes inappropriate.

Of course, if your heart is set on an Earth-made emerald, then absolutely nothing else will do. Just keep in mind that no emerald is perfect. You may have to compromise on one or more of the Four Cs to find the best gemstone for your budget. Ask the jeweler about toughness and care to keep your gem looking perfect for years to come.

Go For the Best Color

Ultimately, if you are purchasing an emerald, you really want a green stone. So, make sure you get a green you like! If you focus on picking the best color, you might forgive a stone for weak clarity or small size.

When it comes to emerald, many people expect to have a deep, dark green. But usually, the stone they fall in love with is much lighter! Lighter gems reflect more light, helping to make them livelier, and most people today prefer them to a darker green with less elegance.

Ask About Enhancements

Just about every emerald has got oil enhancement to fill surface-reaching cracks. This wide-spread and approved treatment method makes the emerald look much better. On the other hand, heat treatment can completely improve emerald color, but emeralds hardly ever receive this enhancement because the stone might crack in the process.

Most importantly, make sure to ask about dyes. Some vendors use dyed oil to fill fractures in emeralds, which enhances color only temporarily. Since the oil comes out of the stone over time, the dye will, too. As a result, you will have an emerald with a different color than when you purchased it. Cleaning or re-oiling a dyed stone will also switch its color. Before purchasing an emerald, ask for a laboratory document that can tell you whether the stone contains any dye.

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